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Corkbark Leaf-Tailed Gecko

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Contents

Taxonomy

Order: Squamata
Family: Gekkonidae
Genus: Uroplatus
Species: pietschmanni

Introduction

The corkbark leaf-tailed gecko also goes by spiny leaf tail gecko and its scientific name, Uroplatus pietschmanni. Most Uroplatus pietschmanni are wild caught and are a fairly hardy species to work with.

Difficulty

Uroplatus pietschmanni are one of the easier Uroplatus geckos to care for. Cool temps and humidity are important, as it is with all Uroplatus. U. pietschmanni can tolerate a broad range than some other species.

Basic Info

Size

Uroplatus pietschmanni grow to approx. 6 inches as adults. The females are slightly larger than the males

Lifespan

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Handling

It is not advised to handle these geckos. They will tolerate some handling, but it should be avoided as to not stress the gecko.

Housing

They like thick branches and corkbark to climb, also Sturdy broadleafed plants.

Substrate

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Temperature

Temperatures in the high 60s to high 70s are satisfactory with a day/night fluctuation. My Pietschmanni have tolerated evening lows to 60 degrees and day highs to 85 degrees with no problems. These temps should not be drawn-out.

Humidity

Mainly, U. pietschmanni like a humid inclosure, but not damp or soggy. A humidity level between 60-70% should be consistent. The substrate should never be watery or muddy, this will lead to infection problems. The cage should be completely misted once in the evening. Let the inclosure dry during the day so that there is no standing water left.

I keep mine in a well ventilated cage (36H x 20 x 20) with screen on the top and on one side. The cage has several inches of soil in the bottom and is planted very well, so it holds humidity. I mist the cage thoroughly every evening.

Lighting

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Feeding

Diet

My U. Pietschmanni eat mostly crickets, and also get the occasional roaches. They are good eaters and wont refuse food.

Supplements

I lightly dust nearly every feeding with a calcium supplement, and I add a multivitamin supplement about once per week. Rep-Cal makes some good supplements.

Hydration

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Advanced

Sexing

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Breeding

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Conclusion

In my experience, U. pietschmanni are a timid gecko, but they get used to their keeper.

References

Websites

Books

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Author

This article was originally written by Katatonia. View other articles by Katatonia. Please note that others may have contributed to this article.

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